Ask me anything

hi! sarah, 20, sophomore at brown university in rhode island, usa. i have a lot of really arbitrary interests, so you'll probably have to expect smatterings or massive spams of the following: doctor who, downton abbey (the last season though? what even), sherlock, misfits, being human, anime, studio ghibli, game of thrones, stuff i find funny, pokémon, game of thrones, nerdfighteria, harry potter, hunger games, jane austen, legend of korra, avengers, buffy, walking dead, other books, poems, lord of the rings, disney... i don't know, a lot of stuff. have a look and linger if you like.
Read the Printed Word!
RAVENCLAW
{ wear }
DOWNTONIAN
{ wear }
SHERLOCK'S SCARF
{ wear }
theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

(via siriusandregulus)

3 hours ago
8,044 notes

youincolor:

magicalwaysleavestraces:

serpensortia88:

Apparently prints of the Swedish book covers can be purchased here.

wow they are beautiful!

oh my god

(via imberantiel)

13 hours ago
99,068 notes

Daniel Brühl on George Stroumboulopoulos Tonight [>]

(Source: beauxtiful, via cumberbruhl)

13 hours ago
567 notes

grrrlfever:

wouldnt it be cool to just like not feel nervous about everything all the time

(Source: lesbolution, via siriusandregulus)

4 hours ago
463,986 notes

paleosteno:

one of my favorite simpsons quotes

(Source: thesimpsonswayoflife, via grrls)

13 hours ago
163,328 notes